Scottsboro Boys Trials
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Letter from Plymouth Methodist Protestant Church in Adrian, Michigan, to Hon. B. M. Miller in Montgomery, Alabama.

Documents

http://betatesting.as.ua.edu/scottsboroboysletters/plugins/img_dump/SB_L_1933.07.14_1023_01.jpg

Title

Letter from Plymouth Methodist Protestant Church in Adrian, Michigan, to Hon. B. M. Miller in Montgomery, Alabama.

Subject

Scottsboro Trial, Scottsboro, Ala., 1931; African Americans--Civil rights--Alabama; African Americans--Imprisonment--Alabama; Miller, Benjamin Meek, 1864-1944; Plymouth Methodist Protestant Church (Adrian, Mich.); Christianity; Mooney, Thomas J., 1882-1942

Description

Albert W. Kauffman, the minister of Plymouth Methodist Protestant Church, writes that, given the evidence, the Scottsboro case seems to be a miscarriage of justice and that cases like it undermine public confidence in the justice system. He hopes that Governor Miller will use his power to release the Scottsboro Boys.

Creator

Plymouth Methodist Protestant Church (Adrian, Mich.)

Source

Alabama Governor, Scottsboro Case appeals to the Governor, SG004239, Folder 17, Alabama Dept. of Archives and History

Date

1933-07-14

Format

Letter

Language

English

Coverage

United States--Michigan--Adrian

Transcription

Plymouth Methodist Protestant Church
[Picture of a church captioned "THE COLLEGE CHURCH"] ALBERT WALLACE KAUFFMAN, Minister 312 State Street
ADRIAN, MICHIGAN.

July 14, 1933

The Hon. B. M. Miller,
Governor of Alabama,
Montgomery, Alabama.

My dear Governor Miller:

For some time several
of the pastors and churchmen of our community
have been studying the case of the nine
Scottsboro negro boys. From the evidence we
have at hand, the whole affair seems to be a
sad misscarriage of justice.

Cases such as these of
these nine unfortunate boys and the case of
Tom Mooney go a long way toward undermining
public confidence in our system of justice.
To say that such undermining is progressing
very rapidly today is but mildly to state the
case. As we of the churches know, this is not
confined to radical elements but is very pre-
valent among the more thoughtful and cultured
classes. Its effect upon courts and justice as
administered through courts in the future, cannot
be definitely gauged today. One cannot escape the
conviction, however, that the effect will be most
disastrous.

Many of us are hopeful that
you will use your powers as governor to release
these boys and thus bring to an end this most
unfortunate affair.

Respectfully and sincerely yours,
Albert W. Kauffman