Letter from C. H. DuVall in Los Angeles, California, to the Governor of the State of Alabama.

Title

Letter from C. H. DuVall in Los Angeles, California, to the Governor of the State of Alabama.

Subject

Scottsboro Trial, Scottsboro, Ala., 1931; African Americans--Civil rights--Alabama; African Americans--Imprisonment--Alabama; Miller, Benjamin Meek, 1864-1944; Baptist Church

Description

C. H. DuVall, a former slave, writes to ask Governor Miller to stay the Scottsboro Boys' execution. He also requests to have the case further investigated as a favor to the weeping mothers and ex-slaves, as he has heard a lot of doubt about the Scottsboro Boys' guilt. The letter is signed "your most humble servant."

Creator

DuVall, C. H.

Source

Alabama Governor, Scottsboro Case appeals to the Governor, SG004234, Folder 40, Alabama Dept. of Archives and History

Date

1931-06-01

Format

Letter

Language

English

Coverage

United States--California--Los Angeles

Transcription

C.H. DUVALL
MEMBER OF THE SUNDAY SCHOOL BOARD
OF THE NATIONAL BAPTIST CONVENTION
REPRESENTING THE STATE OF
ARIZONA

ADDRESS 9234 Pace Avenue

PHONE Los Angeles, California

June 1, 1931
PASTOR OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE MISSIONARY REST AND
BAPT. EVANGELICAL ASSOCIATION
CHURCH
ROYAL COMMANDER OF K.A.M.C

PERFORMS MARRIAGES: ATTENDES FUNERALS
CONDUCTS REVIVALS AND MAKES A SPECIAL-
TY IN RAISING FUNDS FOR THE LIQUIDATION
OF LARGE CHURCH DEBTS, ETC.

A CARD WILL REACH ME AT THE ABOVE
ADRESS

To the Governor of the State of Alabama,
His Excellency ,

Sir:

There is awaiting execution of eight or nine Negro boy's in
Scottsboro, Alabama and from what I can glean through the papers
of the Southland, there is somewhat a doubt in the mind of the
people as to their actual guilt. However, it would be a presump-
tion on my part to attempt in any way whatever to criticise the
finding of the excellent jury who heard the case.

Your Honor, I am writing this letter unsolicited because I
believe there is mercy in the heart of the great Governor of the
State of Alabama. Born a slave myself and at one time was the
property of the famous General Abrahan Buford of Kentucky. Hence
I have had some experience in my seventy-five years in dealing
with my people. It is true if we are not all angels, it is equal-
ly true that we are not all devils and I am quite sure that your
Excellency will agree with my in this statement. The weeping and
wailing of their mother's and of many of our struggling group have
forced me to write this letter begging you to use your preogative
and stay the execution until further investigation can be made.

Believing as I do, your Honor, should you do so it would not
only permit you to be a blessing to humanity, but it would certainly
relieve the conscience's of those who are in power and would certainly
be a great favor to we old ex-slaves who have always tried to work
in conjunction with the white people for the betterment of out
people.

My dear Governor, if there be the slightest chance for mercy
in this case do show it at this point and thereby wipe the tears
away from our old weeping eyes and save a blot from the great name
of Alabama, the home of the greatest industrial center in the world
for my people.

Again I beg you to stay this execution.

Your most humble servant

C.H. Duvall
C. H. CuVall
CHD: DH

(note: criticise - criticize, Abrahan - Abraham, preogative - perogative)