Letter from Carol R. Sloman in Rochester, New York, to His Excellency, The Governor of Alabama.

Title

Letter from Carol R. Sloman in Rochester, New York, to His Excellency, The Governor of Alabama.

Subject

Scottsboro Trial, Scottsboro, Ala., 1931; African Americans--Civil rights--Alabama; African Americans--Imprisonment--Alabama; Miller, Benjamin Meek, 1864-1944; Bates, Ruby, -1976; Price, Victoria, -1982

Description

A young white girl, Carol R. Sloman is concerned about the Scottsboro Boys after reading of the case in the newspaper. She writes that she has had a happy life and has been given many opportunities, and that she has always tried to help others. She believes that African Americans are "to be helped and pitied—not hindered and begrudged." She writes that Ruby Bates and Victoria Price are "low women," and that the Scottsboro Boys should not be made to suffer because of them.

Creator

Sloman, Carol R.

Source

Alabama Governor, Scottsboro Case appeals to the Governor, SG004238, Folder 1, Alabama Dept. of Archives and History

Date

1933-04-10

Format

Letter

Language

English

Coverage

United States--New York--Rochester

Transcription

Rochester
April 11
7 PM
1933
N.Y.



To
His Excellency, The Govenor of
Alabama -
Gov. B. M. Miller -
<u>Personal</u>

TWO FIFTY-FOUR WESTMINSTER ROAD
ROCHESTER, NEW YORK

April 10, 1933

TWO FIFTY-FOUR WESTMINSTER ROAD
ROCHESTER, NEW YORK

To His Excellency, The Govenor of Alabama
Govenor B. M. Miller

Dear Govenor Miller,
I am a young
citizen of these United States and
have never had very much say
in governmental matters except
the right to vote. In reading the
newspaper for the past week
I have been very interested
in this "Scotsboro" case. Living
up here in Rochester, New York
one doesn't get much of a chance
to read New York newspapers,
but fortunately I have been able
to receive and read the New
York Herald Tribune.

2
I am a white girl. I have
always had the best opportunities
for travel and study as a young
girl. My home life has been
a happy one. I have always tried
my best to do for others. I am
connected with two volunteer
social-aide societies that do much
for the sick and needy. I have
came in contact with many
negros, some of high standard
and some of low, but they are
an unfortunate race. They are to
be helped and pitied - not hindered
and begrudged.
Don't you feel deep down
in your heart, govenor Miller,
that these young negro boys are
not being given a fair say or
even a trial - can't you yourself
feel that it's the race not so
much the supposed crime?

3
My thoughts and feeling on
this matter are only the emotions
of one person out of thousands,
Miss Bates and Mrs. Price are
of the lowest type woman - they
aren't to be respected - a "low"
woman is far worse than
a "low" man - These women
are the ones to suffer not
the young negros who are
victims of lies and bigoting
Don't you feel, govenor Miller,
that justice isn't being implied?
I'd give my right arm if I
could keep those fellows in
any possible way, and I
hope that you will be able to
do something.
Sincerely,
Carol R. Slowau